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Review: John Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath’

Student | Niamh Smith John Steinbeck is probably best known as the author of Of Mice and Men, a mainstay of the GCSE syllabus. Reading the novella for the first time, I quickly fell in love with the characters and Steinbeck’s clear, evocative prose style. Years later, I decided to read his 1939 novel The Grapes of Wrath, upon seeing it in a bookshop. Aware that … Continue reading Review: John Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath’

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In Praise of Sherlock Holmes

Student | Niamh Smith To me, a literary character is truly great when they step from the pages of the book(s) in which they appear, and can be reincarnated in another time, another place, but still feel as fresh and as vibrant as the first time you read about them. Some characters transcend the literature in which they appear and become a vital part of … Continue reading In Praise of Sherlock Holmes

The Song of Achilles Review

Student | Charlie Mills Madeline Miller’s novel The Song of Achilles was in fact her first, but the vividness and emotion in her writing suggests writing skill far beyond that of any ordinary debut. From the very first page I was hooked, and immediately read the first seventeen chapters over the course of a two-hour train journey. I could barely put the thing down, so … Continue reading The Song of Achilles Review

‘The Hate U Give’, by Angie Thomas: How one book is changing the publishing industry

Arts Editor | Mimi Markham Every so often, a new publication shakes the waters of the usually quiet internet book community. In February 2017, Angie Thomas’ ‘The Hate U Give’ did just this and its ripples have resonated across the publishing industry, inspiring a recent film adaption. The story follows Starr Caster’s journey towards activism after she witnesses the police shooting of her childhood friend, … Continue reading ‘The Hate U Give’, by Angie Thomas: How one book is changing the publishing industry

London Literature Festival

Student Writer | Tasmin Fatodu For the twelfth year running, the London Literature Festival returned this autumn to the London Southbank Centre with more riveting and diverse Hollywood speakers, poets, authors and artists. The festival was full of lively discussions and talks, with live readings and workshops for all literature interests. Over twenty days, events ranged from a whole weekend of Young Adult fiction to … Continue reading London Literature Festival

The Appeal of Short and Sweet Poetry

Dep. Sports Editor | Jack Wright One of the greatest consistencies within literature is variety. Naturally, this extends to poetry. Genres and themes fade in and out of fashion as cultures evolve and public interest shifts. Homer’s epic poetry, passed on through oral tradition, differs in tone and content from Emily Dickinson’s quatrains. While spotting the differences between one “big” literary name and another, the … Continue reading The Appeal of Short and Sweet Poetry